Teacup National Agility Champions 2016

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The winners of each jump height in Petit Prix competition are accorded the TNAC title. This is a unique title in dog agility as it demands true championship. Each dog earns a weighted score over ten separate events. The winner of each jump height is the dog with the highest aggregate score. So the TNAC is certainly a measurement of consist high placement in each class.

We are pleased to present to you the four TNAC winners at the TDAA 2016 Petit Prix East:

4″ Division

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Presenting the winner of the 4″ Division ~ McCorkle, a Scottish Terrier handled by Melinda Mull.

8″ Division

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Presenting the winner of the 8″ Division, and high in trial at the 2016 TDAA Petit Prix ~ Nikki, a Jack Russell Terrier handled by Cindy Ponyah.

12″ Division

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Presenting the winner of the 12″ Division ~ Karoo, a Cavalier King Charles handled by Stephanie Stempfer.

16″ Division

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The winner of the 16″ Division was Skye, an Australian Shepherd handled by Vic Belebczuk.

Final Results

You can view the final results of the 2016 TDAA Petit Prix HERE.

Event Winners

We are proud to acknowledge the winners of each of the ten individual events at this Petit Prix competition. Winning one or more events certainly contributes to overall success in the Petit Prix, but is no guarantee of final placement. We would be remiss in overlooking these individual class champions.

Standard 1 ~ The first standard course of the tournament weekend was won by Nikki [8″ division], a Jack Russell Terrier handled by Cindy Ponyah. Nicki finished this course with zero faults in an adjusted time of 30.21 seconds.

Full House ~ This popular point accumulation game was won by Cosmo [12″ division], a Papillon handled by Sue Belebczuk. Cosmo finished with game with 61 points, in a time of 38.89 seconds.

Weakest Link ~ This game of strategy and distance skill was won by UNeeQ [8″ division], a Papillon handled by Cookie Nee. UNeeQ won with a score of 186 points, in a time of 64.20 seconds.

Standard 2 ~ The second standard course of the weekend was won by UNeeQ [8″ division], a Papillon handled by Cookie Nee. UNeeQ finished this course with zero faults in an adjusted time of 18.37 seconds.

Beat the Clock ~ This game of sequencing skill was won by UNeeQ [8″ division], a Papillon handled by Cookie Nee. UNeeQ finished the game with the cuckoo bonus, earning 13 points in a time of 37.65 seconds.

Gamblers ~ The winner of this traditional game of distance handling skill was Nikki [8″ division], a Jack Russell Terrier handled by Cindy Ponyah. Nikki finished the game with 81, and a successful gamble, in a time of 44.70 seconds.

Rekoons ~ This game of strategy and skill was won by Jasper [8″ division], a Chinese Crested handled by Susan Eienson. Jasper finished the game with 56 points in a time of 49.12 seconds.

Standard 3 ~ The final standard course of the weekend was won by Annabelle [8″ division], a Cavalier King Charles handled by Stephanie Stempfer. Annabelle finished the course with zero faults with an adjusted time of 26.81 seconds.

In & Out ~ This game of sequencing skill and strategy was won by McCorkle [4″ division], a Scottish Terrier handled by Melinda Mull. McCorkle earned 63 points in a time of 31.04 seconds.

Black Hole ~ The final game of the Petit Prix was won by McCorkle [4″ division], a Scottish Terrier handled by Melinda Mull. McCorkle blistered this wicked Black Hole challenge with zero faults in an adjusted time of 21.20 seconds.

Blog1170 TDAA

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, an invaluable reference for learning the rules and strategies of the games played by agility dogs and their handlers.

TDAA 2016 Petit Prix East ~ Saturday Results

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Standard 2Standard 2

The second day of the Petit Prix featured four events: Three games and a single Standard run. Below you will find a link to the results for each of these events, followed by the combined results which show the total points accumulated by each dog.

Gamblers

The top scoring dog in the Gamblers class was Nikki, a Jack Russell Terrier handled by Cindy Ponyah. Nikki scored 81 points in a time of 44.70 seconds!

Beat the Clock

The top scoring dog in the Beat the Clock class was UNeeQ, a Papillon handled by Cookie Nee. UNeeQ scored 13 points (with the cuckoo!) in 37.65 seconds!

Rekoons

The top scoring dog in the Rekoons class was Jasper, a Chinese Crested handled by Susan Eisenson. Jasper scored 56 points in 49.12 seconds!

Standard 3

The top scoring dog in the final Standard class of the 2016 Petit Prix was Annabelle, a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel handled by Stephanie Stempfer. Annabelle finished this course with zero faults with an adjusted time of 26.81 seconds!

 

Tournament Current Results

 

Friday Results

On the first day of the Petit Prix featured four events: Two standard rounds and two games. Below you will find a link to the results for each of these events.

Standard 1

The first Standard class of the 2016 Petit Prix was won by Nikki, a Jack Russell Terrier handled by Cindy Ponyah. Nikki finished this course with zero faults in an adjusted time of 30.21 seconds!

Full House

The top scoring dog in the Full House class was Cosmo, a Papillon handled by Sue Belebczuk. Cosmo scored 61 points in a time of 38.89 seconds!

Standard 2 ~ fixed link!

The top scoring dog in the second Standard class of the 2016 Petit Prix was won by UNeeQ, a Papillon handled by Cookie Nee. UNeeq finished this course with zero faults in an adjusted time of 18.37 seconds!

The Weakest Link

The top scoring dog in The Weakest Link class was UNeeQ, a Papillon handled by Cookie Nee. UNeeQ scored 186 points in 64.20 seconds!

 

Tournament Friday Results

 

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

TDAA 2016 Petit Prix East ~ Day 1 Results

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On the first day of the Petit Prix we have run four events: Two standard rounds and two games. Below you will find a link to the results for each of these events, followed by the combined results which show the total points accumulated by each dog.

Standard 1

Full House

Standard 2

The Weakest Link

Tournament Current Results

Blog1168 TDAA

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

Games of the 2016 Petit Prix ~ Weakest Link

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The Weakest Link is a game invented by TDAA judge Tara Choate for a Teacup Dogs judging assignment. Tara is a member of Columbia Agility Team in Portland, Oregon.

Briefing

The objective of The Weakest Link is to score as many points as possible in the allotted time. Only “banked” points will count toward the final score. Small dogs have 60 seconds and big dogs will have 55 second to accumulate the best score possible.

The point values are:

  • Jumps, 2 points
  • Tire or tunnels, 4 points
  • Contact obstacles, 6 points
  • Weave poles, 8 points
  • Gamble earns double the usual value of the obstacles. The gamble is bi-directional.

Start the round by directing the dog to any obstacle to earn points. Each obstacle taken by the dog must be worth as much as or more than the previous obstacle taken. The dog’s potential score will increase as each obstacle value is added to the overall total. But the dog can’t keep or count on these points until they are “banked”.

Points are banked (on the sample course below) when the dog performs the green colored pipe tunnel in the center of the course. Banked points are kept secure toward the final score and cannot be lost and the potential points score is set to zero. After banking the dog may begin with a low value obstacle.

Each sequence banked must be unique. There must be at least one difference from any sequence previously banked.

Back-to-back performance of obstacles (and the gamble) is permitted, but only back-to-back. A third performance shall constitute a fault.

If a dog faults, all potential points are lost. Faults include:

  • Dropped bars
  • Missed contacts
  • Taking an obstacle of a lesser value than the previous taken
  • Repeating a banked sequence
  • Taking an obstacle out of sequence in the gamble (only faulted if the cumulative sequence violates the points rule)
  • Failing to bank points before the final whistle

When a dog faults the judge will call “fault”. The handler is obligated to direct the dog to the first obstacle in a new sequence to earn potential points.

If a bar is dropped on a jump, that jump is out of play for the remainder of the game except when that jump is in the gamble sequence. Every attempt will be made to reset the bar on a gamble sequence; if it has not been reset, the dog must be directed between the standards of the jump.

Scoring

Weakest link is scored points, then time. Time is a tiebreaker.

Course Design

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There are a variety of games which can be easily nested with a standard course, and the course designer might be tempted to do the same with the Weakest Link course. But this lazy approach should be approached with some caution. It might be a better approach (no less lazy, but a lot smarter), to nest the standard course based on the set of the well-crafted Weakest Link course.

The overriding design challenge is to provide flow in such a way it might be a real trick of handling to perform obstacle of ever increasing values. The design shouldn’t be obvious or a give-away. However, no obstacle should be left orphaned by meaningless placement or unrealistic risk.

One of design challenges is to provide a reasonable approach to the “bank” from the high value obstacles, including the distance challenge or gamble. This is more difficult than it might appear. A high value obstacle that has too much low value clutter and risk will end up being ignored by most players and thereby actually reduces the size of the floor and the number of strategies that might develop.

Another consideration is to provide some flexibility and variability in the approach to the distance challenge. By rule, each banked sequence must be unique, differing in some way from any previously banked sequence. And so, if the distance challenge has only one real approach, then it will play a diminished role in the game.

Frankly, the game should be about the distance challenge. For those with the requisite skill the strategy should be a study in how many times and how many ways the gamble can be successfully scored and banked.

Judging Notes

You will note that the list of faults does not include a fault for stepping over the containment line of the gamble. This is very important for the judge to understand. For the purpose of point accumulation the gamble (in the sample course) is considered a single 24 point obstacle. If the handler steps over that line all of the obstacles revert to their simple values and the rules of escalating point values will apply.

So, in the sample course if the handler comes out of the tunnel and does one jump on the way to the gamble, and at any time steps over the line, the judge would award the simple value of each obstacle. If, however, the handler approaches the gamble from the A-frame and then steps over the line, the dog will immediately be faulted for doing the first jump, because it is an obstacle of lower value than the last taken.

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

Games of the Petit Prix: In & Out

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At face value, In & Out is a simple follow-the-numbers game. The judge will measure the length of the course and establish a Qualifying Course Time (QCT) based on rates of travel respective to level and jump height. The dog is awarded a bonus of 1 point for every full second under the established QCT.

In & Out is scored Points, Then Time.

Design and Strategy

For a moment I’m going to indulge myself in a discussion of design for this game. In & Out is not an easy design.

IMHO, the In & Out course should feature two concentric rings of obstacles. For the sake of our conversation we have an In loop and an Out loop. The In and Out loop, then, would be a weaving together of the two concentric loops. The In loop should be in one direction; The Out loop should be in one direction; The In & Out loop should feature one or more changes of direction.

A real difficulty in the design of the course is finding smooth transitions between the two loops for the In & Out.

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Each loop is worth a given number of points to be earned, based on a 1-3-5 schedule for performance of obstacles (jumps=1, round things=3; technical obstacles=5).

The rules stipulate that in a faulted loop the dog earns the value of obstacles up to fault, and then the dog must be directed to restart that same loop.

It’s possible that for strategic reasons, the handler might intentionally fault a loop, in order to repeat the performance of a higher value obstacle when restarting the loop. In the example course above, for example, the handler might begin the Out loop and then, on the dismount of the A‑frame, bring the dog back over the #6/11 jump for a wrong course, necessitating a restart of the Out loop. This strategy earns the dog an additional 8 points. The handler might commit this fault a couple times, calculating that he’ll earn more for the repeated obstacles than for the time bonus at the end of the course.

The handler might opt to continue the “faulted loop” strategy until the expiration of time. That would be an interesting gamble and calculation.

The judge’s design might cleverly and intentionally include such a bonus opportunity. Note that if the #13 obstacle had been a jump rather than a 3-pt pipe tunnel, the risk might be marginal, at best.

Note on Timekeeping

Fundamentally when time expires the dog can earn no new points. And so if the dog is still out on the field when time expires it is very important that the time-keeper or electronic equipment signal the expiration of time so that the judge will know to stop awarding points. Aside from the fact that the dog will earn no bonus points for stopping the clock under the QCT, there is no additional fault or down-side to time expiring.

Mind Like a Steel Trap

The judge might like to signal to the scribe the previously calculated value of each loop as the dog finishes. This approach might be very complicated as the dog could fault the second to last obstacle in any loop, thereby earning the value of every obstacle in the loop, save the last two obstacles. The canny judge, with a mind like a steel trap, could simply do the math for each loop, including faults. The only real alternative to this method is to bellow out the value of each obstacle as it is successfully performed.

There’s some call for the handler too, to have a mind like a steel trap. The handler should be completely aware of what obstacle constitutes the “gateway” to each of the three loops. And, on any fault, should direct the dog to that obstacle with all due haste. Note that the gateway obstacles are indicated on the sample course above.

Calendar

Oct  13  , 2016  Petit Prix warm-up workshop  T16057
B&D Creekside Activity Center
Latrobe, PA
Presenter:  Bud Houston
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
At Petit Prix site, lots of crating space, food on site. Seven games strategy and lecture, run as actual trial with qualifying scores and titles possible.

Oct  14 – 15 – 16 , 2016  Eastern PETIT PRIX number T16999
B&D Creekside Activity Center
Latrobe, PA
Judge:  Brenda Gilday, Emil Pohodich
Contact:  Darlene Schmucker at arcmasterdarlene@comcast.net
Indoors on field turf, lots of crating space, restaurant on site. Three standard, 7 games, tournament scoring (see <k9tdaa.com> blogs for tournament scoring rules, over 3 days.
Premium

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance apart.

2016 Western Petit Prix Update ~ May 21

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On the second day of competition at the Western Petit Prix the competition heated right up. Several dogs have established themselves as contenders for a Teacup National Agility Champion (TNAC). This title is conferred upon the winner of each jump height[1].

Today we ran one standard course and played Wild West Pinball, the Box Game, and Weakest Link. Below we have the course maps and games briefings. Look for the individual results under each.

Download the overall tournament standings (as of this evening) here: Petit Prix Standings

Wild West Colorado Pinball

 

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Briefing

The objective of Wild West Pinball is to accumulate as many points in possible in the time allotted. This is a dog’s choice game. Obstacles may be taken in the order and direction of the handler’s choosing.

Time begins when the dog takes the Tire/Slingshot (0 points):

  • 45 seconds for 12″ &16″ dogs;
  • 50 seconds for 4″ & 8″ dogs.Point Values
  • A horn will blow when time expires. The clock continues to run until the dog puts at least one paw on the table. The table is always live (TILT!).
  • Gold Bone Tunnel (Chute) – 100 points
  • Silverton Mining Tunnels – 150 points. Must be taken in order and direction shown
  • Cowdog Cliff Hanger (Teeter) – 150 points. Must approach from between the 2 C-shaped tunnels (without taking either tunnel). The dog may not earn points on the Cowdog Cliff Hanger immediately after taking the Silverton Mining Tunnels.
  • Brekenridge Ski Slalom (Weave Poles) – 150 points. Can be taken in either direction.
  • Pikes Peak Trail – 100 points. Must be taken in order and direction shown.
  • Millenium Bridge – 200 points. Can be taken either 1a to 2b, or 2a to 2b.
  • Golden Nuggets (unnumbered jumps) – 10 points each, bi-directional
  • Slingshot (Tire) – 0 points

Obstacles and sequences may be taken only twice for points. Back-to-back performances are permitted. Bonus obstacles and sequences that are faulted will result in no points for that attempt. Weaves must be completed without fault. There will be no partial credit given for incomplete sequences. Unnumbered jumps (golden nuggets) may be taken as many times as desired.

Faults: 10 points for knocked bars, missed contacts. Doing sequences incorrectly is not faulted; it’s just wasting time. Knocked bars are not reset, and are out of play for the rest of the run. Popping out of the weaves is not faulted, but credit will only be given if they are restarted and completed.

Scoring and Qualification

Wild West Pinball is scored Points, Then Time. The most points wins. Time is tie breaker. To Qualify:

  • Games I – 400 points
  • Games II – 500 points

Download Results

The Box Game

 

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Briefing

The objective of the Box Game is to run a numbered sequence while earning bonuses for several distance challenges. The distance-challenge eligible for bonus is specifically when the dog must go out of the box… with the handler staying inside the box.

Central to the course is a large boxed area which the dog and handler will enter after completing jump #1. Outside of the box are five different distance challenges. Each time the handler sends the dog out of the box and completes the send, a bonus of 5 seconds will be deducted from the dog’s score.

No bonus will be earned for an individual challenge if the handler steps out of the box, or if the dog earns a fault during the send.

Scoring and Qualification

The Box Game is scored Time, Plus Faults, Less Bonus. To qualify, the team must be under the adjusted Qualifying Course Time for their level:

Games I 4″ & 8 ” dogs 54 Seconds
12′′ & 16′′ dogs 50 Seconds
Games II 4″ & 8 ” dogs 41 seconds
12′′ & 16′′ dogs 36 seconds
Games III 4″ & 8 ” dogs 23 seconds
12′′ & 16′′ dogs 21 seconds

 

Download Results

Standard 3

 

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Standard courses shall be judged under rules for performance for the Superior class. Qualifying scores shall be accorded to the titling level of the dog.

Scoring and Qualification

Standard courses shall be scored Faults, Then Time. To qualify the dog must run the course without fault, under the course time. The judge will measure the course to determine the Standard Course Time for each level.

 

Download Results

 

Weakest Link

 

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Briefing

The Weakest Link is a point accumulation game. The object of the game is to score as many points as possible in the allotted time. Only “banked” points will count toward the final score.

Each obstacle taken by the dog must be worth as much as or more than the previous obstacle taken. To keep points earned, they must be “banked” by the dog going through the tire. There are two tires on the field! After points have been banked a new sequence of points-gathering begins. Each sequence banked must be unique, which means there must be at least one difference from any sequence previously banked.

Back-to-back performance of obstacles is permitted, but only back-to-back. A third performance shall constitute a fault.

Unbanked points are considered “potential” points. If a dog commits a fault, all potential points are lost. Faults include dropped bars, missed contacts, taking an obstacle of lesser value than the previous one, failing to bank points before the final whistle. Weaves just must be completed for points, but once started, if not completed before going on it will be called a fault. When a dog faults the judge will call “fault”. The handler then must direct the dog to the first obstacle in a new sequence to earn potential points.

If a bar is dropped on a jump that jump is out of play for the remainder of the game.

This course features two gambles that earn the dog significant bonus points:

  1. 20 point gamble: (white circles) jump/tunnel/jump
  2. 25 point gamble: (white squares) A-frame/tunnelPoints values of obstacles:

The gambles must be taken in the order and direction shown, with the handler behind the gamble line. If the dog knocks a bar, misses a contact, or goes off course in the middle of the gamble – the judge will call “fault”. If the handler steps over the containment line the dog is faulted only if the order of performance breaks the weakest link point value rules.

  • jumps – 2 points
  • tire, tunnels – 4 points
  • contact obstacles – 6 points
  • weave poles – 8 points

12″ and 16″ dogs have 50 seconds; 4″ and 8″ dogs have 55 seconds to accumulate points. When time is up the horn will sound and the dog must cross the finish line to stop the clock.

Scoring and Qualification

The Weakest Link is scored Points, Then Time. Time is a tiebreaker only.

To qualify:

  • Games I – 30 points
  • Games II – 40 points
  • Games III – 50 points

Download Results

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance part.

[1] The TNAC is conferred only if the top dog in a jump height places within the top 25 of the tournament.

2016 Western Petit Prix Update ~ May 20

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Today we ran two standard courses and played Dare to Double and Gamblers. Below we have the course maps and games briefings. Look for the individual results under each.

Download the overall tournament standings (as of this evening) here: Petit Prix Standings

Standard 1

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Standard courses shall be judged under rules for performance for the Superior class. Qualifying scores shall be accorded to the titling level of the dog.

Scoring and Qualification

Standard courses shall be scored Faults, Then Time. To qualify the dog must run the course without fault, under the course time. The judge will measure the course to determine the Standard Course Time for each level.

Download Results

Dare to Double

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Briefing

Dare to Double is a dog’s choice game. 4″ and 8″ inch dogs will have 55 seconds, 12″ and 16″ dogs will have 50 seconds to accumulate as many points as possible. Time starts when the dog crosses the Start line, and ends at the table. The table is live after time has started. A horn will signal the end of point accumulation. If the team reaches the table before the horn, all points earned on course will be keep. If the team fails to get the table before the horn, half of their points will be lost. There will be no warning whistle.

The value of the obstacles is based on a 1-3-5-7-point system.

  • 1 point for jumps
  • 3 points for tunnels and tires
  • 5 points for dogwalk, teeter, and the weave poles
  • 7 points for the dog walk, the first time it is performed.

Scoring obstacles can be taken only twice for points. Back-to-back performances are allowed. Jumps that are knocked down will not be reset.

A successful performance of the A-frame doubles all points earned up to that time. If the dog faults the A-frame, half of the team’s points are lost.

The A-frame is not restricted to only two performances. The dog may double points at any time, and as many times as the handler (or dog) wishes. The important restriction: The dog must complete another obstacle — for points — before reattempting the A-frame.

Scoring and Qualification

Dare to Double is scored Points, Then Time. The dog with the most point’s wins. Time is the tie breaker.

Points needed to qualify:

  • Games III – needs a score of 160 or better
  • Games II – needs a score of 80 or better
  • Games I – needs a score of 40 or better

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Gamblers

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Briefing

Gamblers is a point accumulation game with a distance challenge. The objective is to accumulate as many points as possible in the opening period, then to perform a designated distance gamble within the specified closing time.

In the opening point-accumulation period, teams accumulate points by performing obstacles up to twice for points. Back-to-back performance of any obstacle is allowed. If an obstacle is faulted the team can still attempt it twice for points. Jump bars are not reset if dropped, and that jump is dead for the rest of the run.

In the closing, the dog must do the numbered gamblers sequence while the handler stays behind the containment line. The dog may re-cross the line, but the handler must stay behind it. The dog must complete the obstacles, without fault, before time runs out to get credit for the gamble.

The gamble is worth 20 points.

Special Notes about the Gamble:

Any fault during performance of the gamble will negate the gamble bonus.

Performing two different gamble obstacles one after another in the opening will negate the gamble bonus.

Unproductive loitering near the start of the gamble before point accumulation time has expired will negate the gamble bonus.

Dropping a bar on a gamble jump during the opening will negate the gamble bonus.

Times:

12″ & 16″ dogs = 30 seconds opening, 12 seconds closing

4″ & 8″ dogs = 33 seconds opening, 14 seconds closing

Obstacle values, opening period:

  • jumps – 1 point
  • tire, tunnels – 3 points
  • Aframe, teeter, weaves – 5 points
  • Dogwalk – 7 points
  • Mini-gamble, 2 jumps performed, A-B circles or squares (as marked) while handler stays behind line – 10 points. If done any other way or not behind line, each jump is worth 1 point. Each jump can only be done twice for points, either as gamble or individual obstacles.

All obstacles, including the mini-gamble, can be taken twice for points in the opening period. Weaves can be corrected for credit.

Scoring and Qualification

Gamblers is scored Points, Then Time. The dog with the most point’s wins. Time is the tie breaker.

To qualify:

  • Games III – needs 23 points in opening plus gamble
  • Games II – needs 21 points in opening plus gamble
  • Games I – needs 19 points in opening plus gamble

Download Results 

Standard 2

 

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Standard courses shall be judged under rules for performance for the Superior class. Qualifying scores shall be accorded to the titling level of the dog.

Scoring and Qualification

Standard courses shall be scored Faults, Then Time. To qualify the dog must run the course without fault, under the course time. The judge will measure the course to determine the Standard Course Time for each level.

Download Results

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. The web store is up and running. www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Joker’s Notebook, an invaluable reference for teaching an agility dog (and his handler) to work a distance part.

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