Agility for Small Dogs

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Dog agility was conceived by John Varley as entertainment at the Crufts dog show in 1978. How could he know then what the sport might become, 40 years later? Those of us who were in the sport back in the day are surely counted as pioneers and innovators. [Of course, in the next breath we might be dismissed as clumsy barbarians.]

Clinging to the notion of innovator: I believed that small dogs and their handlers were in no way challenged in the same way that big dogs and their handlers are challenged by our sport. It’s not only jump height. How tightly a dog turns and how many strides the dog takes between obstacles differentiate the challenges.

Let me put it another way: The handler of the small fast dog has absolutely no concept of the skill and timing precision required of the big fast dog handler when that small dog is being run on big dog courses.

And so, we created an organization that would require the small dog handler to develop and hone those skills… The Teacup Dogs Agility Association (TDAA).

Lessons Learned

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The Teacup Dogs Agility Association has been a laboratory for discovery and learning about 20 years now. Aside from my original vision of “comparable challenge” we’ve learned a variety of other interesting bits:

Inspiring the Lackluster Dog

We have discovered that some dogs that approach dog agility in the “big dog” venues with low enthusiasm will light up and catch afire when doing TDAA. While this phenomenon hasn’t been subjected to a scientific study, I’ve personally concluded that the pace of the action is invigorating to a type of dog.

I’d suggest that even if you can’t/won’t travel to compete in the TDAA, that training sequences can be set up to emulate what we do in the TDAA to find inspiration for the erstwhile lackluster dog.

Sharpening the Handler

The first thing a handler new to the TDAA will say when seeing the nearly miniature field of agility equipment is… “Oh! How cute!”  Catch them coming off their first agility course and they are saying “That was really hard!”

Without question the handler of the small dog, aspiring to master the job of handler in dog agility will learn the necessary skills when the course demands those skills to succeed.

Diminished YPS

The equipment used by the TDAA is diminutive. Small A-frame, teeter and dogwalk. And, I was delighted to discover years ago that they make 16″ pipe tunnels, which are perfect for our purposes.

A dog’s rate of travel might have a lower YPS (yards per second) in the TDAA than in big dog agility; although the dog is actually working at the same speed. Sounds like a contradiction, eh?

There is a good scientific explanation for this. The technical obstacles, contacts and weave poles tend to degrade the dog’s rate of travel. In big dog agility the dog has ample room to make up for lost speed in the vast intervals between obstacles. In the TDAA, where obstacles are spaced in intervals of 8′ to 12′, there simply is not running room to recoup the rate of travel.

Safety

TDAA enthusiasts feel that their dogs are safer when playing in the TDAA, than when playing with the big dogs.

Without completely editorializing the topic, let’s just say that many (American) handlers are unconscious of the menace exhibited by their big dogs. The small dog handler must be constantly aware of both threat and danger when in the big dog agility world, and be proactive to guard and protect their small charges.

When playing in the TDAA guarding the safety of the small dog is a more relaxed duty.

Teeter Fear

If there is an obstacle that we use in the TDAA that can create problems for a dog, it might be the teeter. If a dog becomes fearful on the TDAA teeter, that fear will be generalized into the big dog venues.

The teacup teeter should be considered a “new” obstacle to the dog. It doesn’t really matter if the dog has been trained to a big 12’ plank with a heavy fulcrum. This obstacle should be introduced to even the veteran agility dog with caution and in small stages. It’s a short plank, and it drops quick. When introducing the teacup teeter to a dog the fulcrum might be lowered, and someone should control the tip speed of the board, much as you would for a completely novice dog when introducing the big dog teeter.

Post Script

Forgive me if my rhetoric sounded as though I disrespect big dogs and their handlers in agility. To the contrary! I greatly admire big fast dogs and their handlers. Clearly, small dog handlers deserve the same thrill when they run their own small agility dogs.

 

BLOG1333 TDAA

 

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

Games of the 2018 Petit Prix ~ Quidditch

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Hairy Pawter’s Quidditch is the invention of Becky Dean and Jean MacKenzie. The game was played for the first time at Dogwood Training Center in Ostrander, Ohio.

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Briefing

The objective of Quidditch is to perform three sequences and attempt to earn a bonus (the Beater) after each. The point values for each of the sequences are 15, 20, and 25 points respectively. Each sequence can be successfully completed only once. The sequences can be taken in any order.

Big dogs will have 50 seconds; small dog 55 seconds to play.

In case of a fault the team can immediately reattempt the same sequence or move to another sequence.

The three individual sequences can be successfully completed only once. Reattempting a sequence will not earn additional points.

  • Slytherin 15 points ~ This sequence is “dealer’s choice”. That means the obstacles can be taken in the order and direction of the handler’s choosing.
  • Hufflepuff 20 points ~ This sequence is bi-directional. It may be taken as numbered, or in reverse.
  • Gryffindor 25 points ~ This sequence is bi-directional. It may be taken as numbered, or in reverse.

When time expires no new points can be earned.

The Beater

Upon the successful completion of a sequence the team will have the opportunity to earn bonus points for a successful performance of a tire; the Beater bonus, for which the team will earn an additional 25 points

Refusals will be faulted on the beater (the  tire). The inital direction of the dog’s approach to the tire may define the run-out plane of the obstacle for the purpose of judging refusals. If a dog commits a refusal on the tire, the Beater bonus is lost.

After attempting the Beater bonus the team should attempt another sequence. Faulting the Beater does not fault the sequence prior to the attempt.

The Bludgers Rule

  1. A Bludger (wrong course obstacle) performed during the performance of an individual sequence shall result in a sequence fault. No points are earned for the performance of any individual obstacle unless the sequence is not completed due to expiration of time.
  2. Performance of a Bludger after the successful completion of a sequence on the way to the Beater (tire) shall be considered a fault of the Beater. The ability for the team to earn the Beater bonus is lost. The team should proceed to the next sequence, or to the table if appropriate.
  3. If the wrong course occurs: Bludgers (wrong courses) shall not be faulted: between the starting line and the first obstacle of a numbered sequence; between the Beater and the first obstacle of a numbered sequence; between the Beater and the table (to stop time).
  4. No points shall be earned for the performance of any Bludger.

The Keeper

If the team completes each of the three sequences, they will earn a ‘Keeper’ bonus of 50 points in addition to the points of the individual sequences. Note: the Keeper bonus is based on the three sequences alone and is not influenced by success on attempts to earn Beater bonuses.

The Golden Snitch

If a team successfully completes all three sequences, earns all three 25 point Beater bonuses, and touches the table prior to the expiration of time, the team will earn the Golden Snitch bonus of 75 points.

Scoring

Quidditch is scored points then time. The dog with the most points wins. In the case of a tie, the dog with the shortest time will be the winner.

A perfect score requires completion of all three sequences and successful performance of the Beater bonus. The scoring notation would look like this: 15-25-20-25-25-25-50-75.

Qualifying and Titles

Qualifying points required by level shall be:

  • Games I: 110 points
  • Games II: 135 points
  • Games III: 160 points

 

The Warm-Up Workshop

Consistent with tradition, we set aside two days before the Petit Prix for the warm-up workshop, lead by Bud Houston. The workshop is provides very detailed and granular analysis of games strategies and strategies for excelling in the Petit Prix tournament.

Only a few working spots remain. This is an opportunity to acclimate a dog to the building and turf and equipment as the Petit Prix. While courses and games in the workshop will be judged using Superior rules for performance, qualifying scores will accorded to a dog at their respective levels.

Oct   3 – 4  , 2018   TDAA PETIT PRIX warm-up workshop  Trial number T18998
at Four Seasons K9 Athlete Ctr
Washingtonville, OH
Workshop presenter:  Bud Houston
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
Working with the Petit Prix site and equipment; the workshop provides a comprehensive discussion of Petit Prix games and strategies. Each morning session includes two games and a standard course; each afternoon session one game and one standard.
Registration

 

Early Bird Reminder

Entries Postmarked by tomorrow 7/14/18 get a $20 discount for each dog. You can download the Petit Prix premium following the link below:

Oct  5 – 6 – 7 , 2018   TDAA PETIT PRIX  Trial number T18999
at Four Seasons K9 Athlete Ctr
Washingtonville, OH
Judges:  Sheri Rockhill, Pittsburgh, PA,  and Christina Wakefield, Louisville, KY
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
Indoors on padded turf, TDAA-sized equipment, 10 runs for all + final round.
Premium

 

BLOG1331 TDAA

 

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

Games of the 2018 Petit Prix ~ Weakest Link

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The Weakest Link is a dog’s choice game based on a television show from several years ago in which contestants earned a growing pot of cash that couldn’t be kept until “banked”.

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Briefing

The objective of The Weakest Link is to score as many points as possible in the allotted time. Only “banked” points will count toward the final score.

Small dogs have 60 seconds, big dogs have 55 seconds to accumulate the best score possible.

The handler starts the round by directing the dog to any obstacle to earn points. Each obstacle taken by the dog must be worth as much as or more than the previous obstacle taken. The dog’s potential score will increase as each obstacle value is added to the overall total. Points earned for the performance of obstacles earned will be credited to “potential” points. But the dog can’t keep or count on these points until they are “banked”.

Points are banked when the dog performs the tire. When the dog banks his points they are kept secure toward the final score and cannot be lost. When points are banked the potential points score is set to zero; and the dog may begin again with lower value obstacles.

Each sequence banked must be unique. That means there must be at least one difference from any sequence previously banked. The difference might be what obstacles are performed, the order in which obstacles are performed, or the direction which obstacles are performed.

Back-to-back performance of obstacles is permitted, but only back-to-back. A third performance shall constitute a fault.

This course includes a “Gamble”, or distance challenge. The numbered sequence, two jumps and a tunnel are valued at 16 points. The gamble is bi-directional.

If a dog faults, all potential points are lost (banked points can never be taken away from the dog). Faults include:

  • Dropped bars
  • Missed contacts
  • Taking an obstacle of a lesser value than the previous taken
  • Taking an obstacle out of sequence in the gamble (only faulted if the cumulative sequence violates the points rule)
  • Failing to bank points before the final whistle

When a dog faults the judge will call “fault”. The handler is obligated to direct the dog to the first obstacle in a new sequence to earn potential points.

If a bar is dropped on a jump, that jump is out of play for the remainder of the game except when that jump is in the gamble sequence. Every attempt will be made to reset the bar on a gamble sequence; if it has not been reset, the dog must be directed between the standards of the jump.

Scoring

Weakest link is scored points, then time. Time is a tiebreaker. The point values are:

  • Jumps, 2 points
  • Tire or tunnels, 4 points
  • Contact obstacles, 6 points
  • Weave poles, 8 points
  • Gamble, double the usual value of the obstacles in the gamble

In the dog’s score each number earned is added to the potential points until the dog “banks” those points. Points that are not banked are lost on a fault or when time expires.

 

Strategies

  • The winner of this game is likely to be the dog that successfully completed the gamble more times than any other dog. The handler must be mindful that every sequence must be unique, as the judge has a mind like a steel trap and will fault a repeated performance. Key to scoring on the gamble multiple times will be finding different combinations that end with the 16-point gamble.
  • When the dog earns a fault… don’t go to the bank. You have nothing to deposit. The next obstacle the dog takes will begin a new accumulation.
  • On this course, when attempting the gamble as numbered it is not a terrible fault if the dog commits to A-frame rather than the tunnel. The “wrong course” doesn’t keep the dog from earning the simple value of obstacles. Instead of earning 16 points, the dog will earn 10.
  • On this course, when attempting the gamble in reverse order, if the handler has to step over the line after the pipe tunnel, it would be a mistake to go on to the jump, because that would be a fault for taking an obstacle of lesser value than the last. So, if you must step over the line, the dog should be turned around to repeat the pipe tunnel or put up and over the A-frame before going to the bank.

 

The Warm-Up Workshop

Consistent with tradition, we set aside two days before the Petit Prix for the warm-up workshop, lead by Bud Houston. The workshop is provides very detailed and granular analysis of games strategies and strategies for excelling in the Petit Prix tournament.

Only a few working spots remain. This is an opportunity to acclimate a dog to the building and turf and equipment as the Petit Prix. While courses and games in the workshop will be judged using Superior rules for performance, qualifying scores will accorded to a dog at their respective levels.

Oct   3 – 4  , 2018   TDAA PETIT PRIX warm-up workshop  Trial number T18998
at Four Seasons K9 Athlete Ctr
Washingtonville, OH
Workshop presenter:  Bud Houston
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
Working with the Petit Prix site and equipment; the workshop provides a comprehensive discussion of Petit Prix games and strategies. Each morning session includes two games and a standard course; each afternoon session one game and one standard.
Registration

 

Early Bird Reminder

Entries Postmarked by tomorrow 7/14/18 get a $20 discount for each dog. You can download the Petit Prix premium following the link below:

Oct  5 – 6 – 7 , 2018   TDAA PETIT PRIX  Trial number T18999
at Four Seasons K9 Athlete Ctr
Washingtonville, OH
Judges:  Sheri Rockhill, Pittsburgh, PA,  and Christina Wakefield, Louisville, KY
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
Indoors on padded turf, TDAA-sized equipment, 10 runs for all + final round.
Premium

 

BLOG1330 TDAA

 

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

Games of the 2018 Petit Prix ~ Jumplers

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Take a little bit of Jumpers, add a little bit of Gamblers… shake it up and you’ve got Jumplers. This is a fun game that marries speed and jumping to distance work. This game is always guaranteed fun at a trial.

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Briefing

This Jumplers course must be run in numbered order. The dog will earn bonuses for successfully performing distance challenges. These bonuses will be deducted from the dog’s total score.

Two bonuses are indicated on this course:

  • 5 Point Bonus ~ Handler remaining behind the green line, send the dog into the #6 pipe tunnel. The handle is allowed to step over the line after the dog is completely in the tunnel.
  • 10 Point Bonus ~ Handler remains on the opposite side of the red line send the dog to perform jumps #10, 11 and 12.

A bonus is lost if the dog drops a bar, takes a wrong course obstacle, or if the handler steps over the containment line.

There is no penalty for not attempting the distance challenges. The handler may opt to run portions of the course or the entire course, as a straightforward Jumpers round.

Scoring

Jumplers is scored Time, Plus Faults, Less Bonus. The team with the lowest score wins.

 

The Warm-Up Workshop

Consistent with tradition, we set aside two days before the Petit Prix for the warm-up workshop, lead by Bud Houston. The workshop is provides very detailed and granular analysis of games strategies and strategies for excelling in the Petit Prix tournament.

Only a few working spots remain. This is an opportunity to acclimate a dog to the building and turf and equipment as the Petit Prix. While courses and games in the workshop will be judged using Superior rules for performance, qualifying scores will accorded to a dog at their respective levels.

Oct   3 – 4  , 2018   TDAA PETIT PRIX warm-up workshop  Trial number T18998
at Four Seasons K9 Athlete Ctr
Washingtonville, OH
Workshop presenter:  Bud Houston
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
Working with the Petit Prix site and equipment; the workshop provides a comprehensive discussion of Petit Prix games and strategies. Each morning session includes two games and a standard course; each afternoon session one game and one standard.
Registration

 

Early Bird Reminder

Entries Postmarked by tomorrow 7/14/18 get a $20 discount for each dog. You can download the Petit Prix premium following the link below:

Oct  5 – 6 – 7 , 2018   TDAA PETIT PRIX  Trial number T18999
at Four Seasons K9 Athlete Ctr
Washingtonville, OH
Judges:  Sheri Rockhill, Pittsburgh, PA,  and Christina Wakefield, Louisville, KY
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
Indoors on padded turf, TDAA-sized equipment, 10 runs for all + final round.
Premium

 

BLOG1329 TDAA

 

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

 

Games of the 2018 Petit Prix ~ Pole Jacks

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Pole Jacks is intended as a game of strategy, comparable to Snooker. Pole Jacks creates an atmosphere for intensive work on the weave poles. The game requires consistent performance and pits the dog against the poles with a variety of entries and velocity of approach. Use this game in training to sharpen everyone’s weave pole work. Pole Jacks has been called Weave Pole Snooker.

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Briefing

Pole Jacks is played like the children’s game of jacks. The performance of a short set of weave poles is the bounce of the ball. All other obstacles on the course are jacks and have specific point values.

After the “bounce” (doing the weave poles), the team must “pick up” the appropriate number of jacks by scoring an equivalent number of points. The handler and dog team will bounce “onesies,” bounce “twosies,” bounce “threesies,” and so forth until either they reach bounce and “sevensies” or time expires.

The dog’s time begins when he first makes a “legal” entry into the weave poles, entering between pole #1 and pole #2 from right to left. Small dogs will have 60 seconds to play; big dogs will have 55 seconds. The end-of-time whistle ends scoring only; the clock continues to run until the dog goes to the table. After the time whistle, there will be no fault and no points for the dog taking additional obstacles on the way to the table or finish line to stop time.

The dog must pick up points equaling the number for which the team is shooting after the bounce. If the dog is shooting for 6, he could do a jump and the A-frame, or he could do a tunnel and the tire.

No obstacle may be taken twice on the same pick up.

Scoring

Pole Jacks is scored Points, Then Time. The dog’s score will be the number of his last complete pick-up. The winner is the dog with the highest points and with least time in the case of a tie. The maximum points that can be earned are 7.

The following point values are assigned to obstacles:

  • Jumps, 1 point
  • Tunnels and tire, 3 points
  • Teeter, Dogwalk and A-frame, 5 points

If a dog faults during a pick-up, the dog must again bounce (perform the poles) and retry that same number. Faults include the following:

  • Any of the usual performance faults (missed contact, knocked pole and so on)
  • Picking up a number greater than the number for which the team is shooting
  • Crossing the line of weave poles with incomplete points in the pick up
  • Repeating an obstacle in the same pick up

 

Refinements on the Rules

If a dog drops a bar, that jump will be out of play for the balance of the game.

A pick-up is safe only after the dog makes a legal entry into the weave poles after scoring the points in the pick-up.

The weave poles cannot be faulted. If a dog pops out, the handler has the option to restart from the beginning, or just put the dog back in where he popped out.

If the dog has a pick-up of 7 points some caution should be taken while approaching the table to stop time. If the dog, for example, takes an extra jump on the way to the table then the 7-point pick-up is faulted for scoring a number too high.

Traditionally the table is treated as “part of the floor” before the dog is on the 7-point pick-up and has no point value. But, FAIR WARNING, attend the briefing and be sure this is clearly stated. The judge may establish rules that have no bearing on tradition.

 

Strategy

Understand your dog’s strengths and weaknesses. If a dog has a problematic relationship with an obstacle, exercise discretion in including that obstacle in the scoring strategy.

Find the shortest path. A dog can beat a faster dog if the path is smarter.

Consider bringing a trained dog. Here’s a YouTube recording of Marsha Houston doing daily meal-time training with her dog Pip (a terrorist mix). Marsha wants this dog to be ready for Pole Jacks at the Petit Prix!

 

Early Bird Reminder

Entries Postmarked by 7/13/18 get a nice discount. Refer to the Petit Prix premium for details:

Oct  5 – 6 – 7 , 2018   TDAA PETIT PRIX  Trial number T18999
at Four Seasons K9 Athlete Ctr
Washingtonville, OH
Judges:  Sheri Rockhill, Pittsburgh, PA,  and Christina Wakefield, Louisville, KY
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
Indoors on padded turf, TDAA-sized equipment, 10 runs for all + final round.
Premium

 

BLOG1327 TDAA

 

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

Games of the 2018 Petit Prix ~ Steeplechase

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The Steeplechase is an iconic game in dog agility. In the TDAA we recognize the course design guidelines and base performance rules as the game is played in the USDAA. The AKC’s Time to Beat is an imitation of the Steeplechase and bears some of the same characteristics.

In the USDAA the Steeplechase is run as two rounds and has the flavor of a tournament game. In the TDAA we content ourselves with a single round.

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In the Steeplechase there will be no refusals. Or, at any rate, they will not be faulted. The scoring basis shall be Time, Plus Faults rather than Faults, Then Time as in a Standard class.

Course design requires the A-frame and the weave poles, one of which must be performed twice.

A Steeplechase course should be designed to be fast, rather than technical. A well-designed course should be a complete “ripper” that allows both dog and handler to let it all out and run like the wind.

With the dog working at full extension even modest wrong course options will test the handler to keep the dog’s nose pointed to the course.

Tournament Note

The Steeplechase is the second game of the Petit Prix Tournament. The Tournament was started with Just in Time (https://wp.me/p18bml-13n). But after the Steeplechase every handler will see his or her dogs in the “accumulator” score-sheet in which the first two games are combined into a score based on Performance Points.

The third and fourth events of the Tournament will be Standard courses.

Everyone will begin calculating whether they will be defending a high score, or scratching and clawing to improve their standing.

Early Bird Reminder

Entries Postmarked by 7/13/18 get a nice discount. Refer to the Petit Prix premium for details:

Oct  5 – 6 – 7 , 2018   TDAA PETIT PRIX  Trial number T18999
at Four Seasons K9 Athlete Ctr
Washingtonville, OH
Judges:  Sheri Rockhill, Pittsburgh, PA,  and Christina Wakefield, Louisville, KY
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
Indoors on padded turf, TDAA-sized equipment, 10 runs for all + final round.
Premium

 

BLOG1326 TDAA

 

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

Games of the 2018 Petit Prix ~ Just in Time

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The objective of Just in Time is to score as many points as possible until time expires. Finishing within two seconds over time is rewarded with a fabulous bonus and heaps of glory. On the other hand, finishing under time earns the dog no bonus, and likely an ignominious placement.

Just in Time is a dog’s choice game in which the handler is challenged to make an estimate of how much work the dog can do in the allotted time.

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Obstacles can be performed only twice for points. Back-to-back performances are permitted.

Time ends on the table. The table becomes live after the dog has earned at least one point (the Mr. Banks rule).

Scoring

Just in Time is scored Points, Then Time.

The points system is 1-3-5.

  • Jumps are worth 1 point
  • Tunnels and the tire are worth 3 points
  • The A-frame and weave poles are worth 5 points.
  • 4″ and 8″ dogs will have 33 seconds; 12″ and 16″ will have 30 seconds.

The dog will earn a time bonus for getting to the table or finish line after the end of the point-accumulation period.

  • Less than 2 seconds earns 30 bonus points
  • Less than 4 seconds earns 20 bonus points
  • Less than 6 seconds earns 10 bonus points

Unproductive loitering near the table is not permitted and shall result in loss of time bonus points.

Strategy

  1. If you have work to do in the back of the ring, you should do that work early, saving the front of the ring for the closing so that your dog can be near to the table when time expires.
  2. Identify the high value obstacles on course and make a plan to do each of them twice. Back-to-back performance of obstacles is allowed and might be used with the high value obstacles.
  3. If there is an obstacle on the course that your dog is struggling with, maybe you would do well to avoid going anywhere near it.
  4. Find a smooth and flowing path for your dog so that you can work at your best speed. Avoid choppy and unnecessary turning and handling.
  5. Prepare for this game ahead of time. While you are at practice, pace off sequences to measure distance, and then time your dog on those sequences. Take note of how contact obstacles and the weave poles affect your dog’s rate of travel.

 

Early Bird Reminder

Entries Postmarked by 7/13/18 get a nice discount. Refer to the Petit Prix premium for details:

Oct  5 – 6 – 7 , 2018   TDAA PETIT PRIX  Trial number T18999
at Four Seasons K9 Athlete Ctr
Washingtonville, OH
Judges:  Sheri Rockhill, Pittsburgh, PA,  and Christina Wakefield, Louisville, KY
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com
Indoors on padded turf, TDAA-sized equipment, 10 runs for all + final round.
Premium

 

BLOG1324 TDAA

 

Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.