TDAA Petit Prix 2019 Results

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Following is a report of the entire weekend of the 2019 Petit Prix in Central Point, Oregon. For each game the top 10 scores are included with the course-map and briefing for each event.

Significant in the results, the high scoring dog in each class won Top Dog honors, earned exceptional tournament points, and earned a bye into the final round.

While the briefing includes course times and qualifying criteria for all levels, that information was significant only in the determination of qualifying criteria, which did not influence tournament placement.

Power & Speed

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Briefing

The dog will run a course that is split into two sections: Power and Speed.

Power – The Power section on this course is the blue numbered sequence.

The Power section is un-timed. Consequently, the start-line is positioned between the last obstacle of the Power section and the first obstacle of the Speed section. Any faults earned by the dog will be added to the dog’s time. For example, if the dog misses a contact or earns a refusal on a contact obstacle, his score would be 5 for the Power section. Obviously, the ideal score for the Power section is 0.

Speed – The Speed section contains a straightforward sequence of jumps and tunnels, labeled #1 to #17 on this course.

Top 10 Results

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4-Leaf Clover

(Mutant stem 3-Leaf variation)

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Briefing

Four Leaf Clover is a numbered course. Start with stem choice, either jumps OR the jump/weaves. Perform the three leaves of the clover as numbered. #8 and #11 tunnels are bi directional. The dog may exit the clover with the same choice, or do the other.

Bonuses

The dog will earn bonuses when the handler stays in the containment zone.

  • 15 points for Jump/Weaves in the stem; can be earned twice, both at the start and on the finish. The handler must be in the containment zone.
  • 5 points for any tunnel. The handler must be in the containment zone.
  • 5 points additional for the #4 tunnel if the handler sends from behind the #2/#6 jumps.
  • 50 points for running the full course with handler in the containment zone (regardless of obstacles faulted)

Scoring and Qualifying

4 Leaf Clover is scored Time, Plus Faults, Less Bonuses.

Games I      4″ / 8″         60      sec

12″ / 16″     54      sec

Games II     4″ / 8″         48      sec

12″ / 16″     43      sec

Games III    4″ / 8″         38      sec

12″ / 16″     33      sec

Top 10 Results

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Standard 1

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Briefing

Standard courses as the Petit Prix are judged under Superior performance rules. However, qualification shall be accorded to any dog that runs without fault at the level for which the dog is eligible, using rates of travel appropriate for that level.

Standard courses are scored Faults, Then Time.

Top 10 Results

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Standard 2

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Briefing

Standard courses as the Petit Prix are judged under Superior performance rules. However, qualification shall be accorded to any dog that runs without fault at the level for which the dog is eligible, using rates of travel appropriate for that level.

Standard courses are scored Faults, Then Time.

Top 10 Results

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Tag 10

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Briefing

Tag 10 is a point accumulation game. The purpose of Tag 10 is to accumulate points in 10-point blocks and to accumulate as many of those 10-point sets as possible.

Time starts with the first Tag. Scoring ends on timekeeper’s whistle (or horn). Time stops with the final Tag of the tire. Small dogs have 60 seconds; Big dogs have 55 seconds.

Play starts with a “tag” (performance of a tire) and ends with a “tag” after the time whistle blows. The logic of the game is simple:

  1. Initial “Tag”
  2. The team gathers a 10-point set (exactly 10 points),
  3. “Tag”
  4. “Repeat” with another, unique, 10-point set (no more, no less than 10 points),
  5. “Tag” and repeat until the whistle blows
  6. One last “Tag” to stop time

Each 10-point set must be unique. The team may not repeat a sequence—either forward or in reverse. Dogs cannot take the same obstacle back-to-back. They can take the same obstacle only twice in a sequence as long as another obstacle is taken in between. Individual obstacles may be taken as many times as desired so long as sequences are unique.

Obstacles have these values.

  • Jumps                    2 points
  • Tunnels 3 points
  • Contacts and weaves 5 points

If a dog faults an obstacle, no points are awarded for that obstacle. The dog must perform another obstacle before repeating the faulted obstacle. If a bar is dropped the jump is out of play.

If the dog is mid-sequence when time is called, the extra points are added to the dog’s score with the final Tag. Example: A dog with four complete sequences and 6 extra points when the whistle blows will earn 46 points after the final tag.

Scoring and Qualifying

Tag 10 is scored points then time. Time is a tiebreaker only.

Games I     17 points (at least two sequences)

Games II      24 points (at least three sequences)

Games III    35 points (at least four sequences)

Top 10 Results

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Lucky 13

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Briefing

The object of Lucky 13 is to collect as many points as possible while correctly performing a total of 13 unique obstacles – no more, no less – with the 13th obstacle being the tire. The order and direction is up to the handler. Each obstacle is assigned a direction and value indicated by the cone next to it. Some obstacles may have two different point values indicated by the cones.

A horn or whistle will mark the end of course time. When time expires no new points can be earned. Qualifying course time shall be 50 seconds for small dogs; 45 seconds for big dogs.

General

  • If the dog correctly performs more than 13 obstacles, only the first 13 count for points;
  • Each obstacle numbered in both directions may be performed in each direction for points indicated by that direction. Each direction performed without fault counts as one of the thirteen obstacles;
  • An obstacle labelled with only one number is bi-directional and will earn that point value in either direction.
  • Repeated obstacles will NOT be included in the obstacle count or earn points for the dog; and may be used/repeated for flow.
  • The tire must be the thirteenth obstacle and is bi-directional.
  • A faulted obstacle is not included in the count of 13 obstacles to be done; and may not be repeated for points.

Special Faults ~ Ten faults are assessed for:

  • Each obstacle MORE or LESS than the required 13 (not counting repeated obstacles); and
  • The tire NOT being the thirteenth obstacle.

Scoring and Qualification

Lucky 13 is scored Points, Less Faults, Then Time. To qualify the dog must earn:

  • Games I – 102 points
  • Games II – 128 points
  • Games III – 154 points

Top 10 Results

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Standard 3

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Briefing

Standard courses as the Petit Prix are judged under Superior performance rules. However, qualification shall be accorded to any dog that runs without fault at the level for which the dog is eligible, using rates of travel appropriate for that level.

Standard courses are scored Faults, Then Time.

Top 10 Results

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Standard 4

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Briefing

Standard courses as the Petit Prix are judged under Superior performance rules. However, qualification shall be accorded to any dog that runs without fault at the level for which the dog is eligible, using rates of travel appropriate for that level.

Standard courses are scored Faults, Then Time.

Top 10 Results

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Quidditch

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Briefing

The objective of Quidditch is to perform at least three of the four available sequences, in any order, and attempt to earn a bonus (the Beater) after each. The handler may opt to attempt all four sequences.

·         15 points:   Purple colored squares 1-3 (bi-directional)
·         20 points:   Blue colored circles 1-4
·         25 points:   Green colored circles 1-4 (bi-directional)
·         25 points:   Pink colored squares 1-4 (bi-directional)

The Beater

Upon the successful completion of a sequence the team dog can earn 25 bonus points for the Beater (tire) with the handler staying outside the containment zone. A refusal on the Beater will negate the bonus.

After the Beater, the dog should attempt another sequence. Faulting the Beater does not fault the prior sequence.

The Bludgers Rule

A Bludger is a wrong-course obstacle.

  1. A Bludger performed during the performance of a sequence results in a sequence fault.
  2. A Bludger performed after a sequence on the way to the Beater shall fault the Beater.
  3. A Bludger shall not be faulted; 1) between the start line and the first obstacle of an individual sequence; 2) between the Beater and the first obstacle of a numbered sequence; 3) between the Beater and the table (to stop time)

Bonuses

A 50-point Keeper bonus is earned if the dog completes each of the different individual sequences.

A 75-point Golden Snitch bonus is earned if the dog earns the Keeper bonus and all three Beater bonuses and gets on the table before time expires.

Scoring and Qualification

Quidditch is scored Points, then Time. Time is a tiebreaker only. Big dogs have 60 seconds; small dogs have 65 seconds.

Top 10 Results

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Snooklers

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Snooklers is a point accumulation game played in two parts: a dog’s choice opening followed by a closing sequence.  The opening focuses on course challenges that require the dog to work away from the handler.

Small dogs have 65 seconds; big dogs have 70 seconds.

In the Opening the dog must successfully do a red gamble sequence (earning 1 point) followed by one colored obstacle, 2 through 7. The dog must attempt all three gamble sequences before starting the closing sequence.

Each red gamble may be taken only one time. If a red gamble is faulted the team must move on to another red gamble sequence, or begin the closing sequence if all three red gambles have been spent

In the closing the dog continues to earn points in the numbered sequence until they are all done, or an obstacle is faulted, or time expires. The dog must cross the finish line to stop time.

Snooklers is scored points, then time.

Top 10 Results

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Championship Round

The game or course used in the Championship round was an Exhibitors choice rerun of one of the games or courses in this catalog. Exhibitors chose by written ballot.

The ballots concluded that 4-Leaf Clover would be the Finals game.

Placement within this round solely shall determine placement in each jump height for the Petit Prix Tournament[1].

Significant in the results, the high scoring dog in each jump height earned the Teacup National Agility Champion (TNAC) title.

Results of the Championship Round

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

[1] Performance points earned in the Semi-Finals shall serve as tertiary tie-breaker in the Championship Round.

OCTOBER 4-6, 2019 PETIT PRIX Entry For Dogs Not Qualified

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TDAA PETIT PRIX ~ October 4-6, 2019

Dogs that have not earned a Petit Prix Qualifier are welcome to participate in all classes in the Petit Prix. These dogs will not be eligible for tournament placement but may earn placement ribbons by class and qualifying scores towards the titles for which the dog is eligible.

To Enter your dog without qualification, follow these instructions:

  1. Download the Petit Prix Premium here:
    PetitPrixPremium.pdf

  2. Fill it out and send it in with payment. On your cover letter indicate that your dog has not earned a Petit Prix qualifier.

  3. If your dog subsequently qualifies, notify the TDAA promptly with your Qualification Certificate.

Dogs not qualified (DNQ) will not be included in class results throughout the tournament and will not influence the Performance Points earned by all dogs.

The top scoring DNQ dog will be acknowledged at the end of tournament.

“Your relationship with the dog is elemental and fundamental. The dog should be ever treated with kindness and with a generosity of spirit and heart.”  – TDAA founder, Bud Houston

Cloud Nine Dogs ~ Judges’ Clinic

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Congratulations to the TDAA judges earning judging certification or recertification at the TDAA judges clinic led by Dennis Vogel at Cloud Nine Training School for Dogs in New Hope, Minnesota on August 4, 2019.

Cloud9Dog Clinic 2019

Kim Vogel, Randy Breaden, and Lauren Kolean on the left. Ann-Marie Vossler, Karl Johnson, Donni Breaden, Dennis Vogel, and Chad Kolean on the right.

 

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

Games of the 2019 Petit Prix; part four

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Lucky 13

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Briefing

The object of Lucky 13 is to collect as many points as possible while correctly performing a total of 13 obstacles – no more, no less – with the thirteenth obstacle being the tire. The course design is up to the handler. Each obstacle is assigned a value indicated by the cone next to it. Some obstacles may have two different point values indicated by the cones.

A horn or whistle will mark the end of course time. When time expires no new points can be earned. The judge will establish an appropriate Qualifying Course Time (QCT).

General

  • If the dog correctly performs more than 13 obstacles, only the first 13 count for points;
  • Each obstacle numbered in both directions may be performed in each direction for points indicated by that direction. Each direction performed without fault count as one of the thirteen obstacles;
  • An obstacle labelled with only one number is bi-directional and will earn that point value in either direction.
  • Repeated obstacles will not be included in the obstacle count or earn points for the dog;
  • The tire must be the thirteenth obstacle and is bi-directional.
  • A faulted obstacle is not included in the count of 13 obstacles to be done; and may not be repeated for points.

Special Faults ~ Ten faults are assessed for:

  • Each obstacle MORE or LESS than the required 13; and
  • The tire NOT being the thirteenth obstacle.

Scoring and Qualification

Lucky 13 is scored Points, Less Faults, Then Time. To qualify the dog must earn:

  • Games I – 102 points
  • Games II – 128 points
  • Games III – 154 points

Strategies

In Lucky 13 the course designer is required to put number cones from #1 through #20 on the field. There might not be 20 obstacles, so some of the obstacles will have different values depending on the direction the obstacle is performed.

The most points that can be scored will require the dog to perform #8 through #20… which adds up to 13 obstacles. Having attained the perfect score, the fastest dog and /or the most efficient path will win the day.

The simple thing to do is take the course map and “X” out #1 through #7—numbers that the dog should not take. You will have to design a strategy for these 13 obstacles.

  • As the tire is required to be the 13th obstacle, you might play your course back-wards, beginning with the tire. The challenge will be to end this back-wards at the “start” line.
  • Find the most efficient path
  • Design your sequence in such a way that you understand the handling implications.
  • For those obstacles that have only one number, don’t be influenced by the side or end of the end of the obstacle where the number is place on the course map. The course designer might very well have intentionally placed the number on the side opposite what might have been a dandy strategic path for the dog.
  • You should make yourself well acquainted with the rules of the game so that if you make an error you will know what to do to recover. For example:
    • Repeated obstacles will not be included in the obstacle count or earn points for the dog. Consequently, repeating an obstacle has no real downside, except the time the second performance might use. Indeed, there might be a strategic advantage to repeating an obstacle for flow.
    • A faulted obstacle is not included in the count of 13 obstacles to be done; and may not be repeated for points. When an obstacle is faulted, then, the dog has to be directed to an obstacle that might not have been in the original strategy. Failing pick up that extra obstacle will mean that the tire will be the 12th obstacle rather than the 13th, as require.
  • If your plan doesn’t go perfectly the least productive thing you can do is have a melt-down. Pick yourself up and finish as smartly as possible. Maximize the number of tournament points that you earn.

Judging Notes

The judge needs to see all of the number cones. They should be set facing a place somewhere in the center of the field where the judge intends to conduct this class. It might be useful to remind exhibitors not to move the number cones during the walkthrough. The cones are positioned for the judge, not for the exhibitor.

When the dog faults an obstacle, the judge will call out the number of the obstacle and then “Fault”. The score-keeping table should be briefed to understand the notation on the scribe’s sheet: A number with a fault will not be included in the count of 13 obstacles and may not be repeated for points.

Enter the 2019 Petit Prix

Time is growing short. The Petit Prix is less than two months away!

OR
Oct 4– 6, 2019 TDAA Petit Prix!!
Jackson County Expo, Central Point, Oregon
Judges:  Norm and Robin Carlstrom, Lynnwood, Washington
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com

Fairgrounds atmosphere. Four standard classes and six games over two days. Games include Power & Speed, Four-Leaf Clover, Lucky 13, Tag 10, Quidditch, and Snooklers. Warm-up workshops (Wed-Thu prior to PP) provide an opportunity to acclimate AND you earn Qs and titles!

Premium

The TDAA has approved a restricted entry for DOGS NOT QUALIFIED. Follow this link for information. Feel free to share this PDF.

2019PetitPrixforNQDogs.pdf

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

Games of the 2019 Petit Prix; part three

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We continue discussion of the games of the 2019 Petit Prix.

Four-Leaf Clover

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Briefing

The objective of this game is for the dog to perform a numbered sequence and earn bonuses for working at a distance from the handler.

The dog must first perform the stem of the clover, and then each of the leaves. The dog will earn bonuses for the handler remaining in the containment area (usually defined by the jumps). The course ends when the dog makes his way back down the stem to the finish line.

On this course the petals can be taken in the order of the handler’s choice.

Qualifying course time is established by the judge based on the measured length of the course.

30 bonus points are possible. The dog will earn a 5-point bonus for each petal of the clover if the handler stays in the containment area and the dog performs the petal without fault. The dog may also earn a 5-point bonus for the stem in both directions. In order to earn the first bonus, the handler must leave the dog on a stay and be in the containment area before the dog crosses the start line. The last bonus will be earned as with the petals, the handler must stay in the containment area while sending the dog away to finish the course.

In the petal opposite the stem the dog earns a 5-point bonus if the handler does not advance past the #2 jump. An additional 5-point bonus shall be given to the dog if the handler remains behind the #1 jump.

Scoring

Four Leaf Clover is scored Time, Plus Faults, Less Bonus

Strategies

There are many points of strategy worth contemplating. Here’s a simple list:

  • The very first bonus that can be earned is the initial call over the first three hurdles. All the handler has to do is get in the box before the dog commits through the tire. Be mindful that if the dog breaks the stay at the start line, the bonus might be lost.

    It’s worthwhile for the handler to watch the dog while taking a lead out. If the dog breaks his stay… the handler could step into the box before the dog commits through the tire. With that in mind, it might be useful to start the dog back an extra 5′ or so to give the handler a second more to get in the box.

  • It’s not a terribly bad idea to practice sends over jumps to a tunnel well before testing the skill at the Petit Prix. While it’s possible that the judge may do something evil in the petals—like putting the weave poles out there, or the teeter—the tradition is to use a U-shaped pipe tunnel.

    Practice your lead out, as well.

  • The Qualifying Course Time for this game builds in some expectation for success. The course was measured and course time by level and jump height was calculated, with a bit of time taken out of each QCT. Games 1 was reduced is by 5 seconds; Games 2 is reduced by 10 seconds; and Games 3 is reduced by 15 seconds.

    The handler must weigh whether it’s worthwhile just to run the dog against the chance that a send may go wobbly and spoil whatever bonus might have been earned.

  • It’s tempting to grab the double-bonus (white squares, #1 to #5) right off the bat. If the handler has confidence that the dog will succeed in that longer send, it doesn’t make much sense to approach it out of a turn. And so the best time to grab the double-bonus is with the dog coming out of the stem.
  • In the history of this game as many bonuses are lost getting to the jump after the tunnel, as are lost getting to the tunnel itself. The handler shouldn’t go flat-footed admiring his work after the dog goes into the tunnel… the dog will need direction coming out of the tunnel to get back to the jump.
  • Most handler’s will intuitively put themselves on the turning side of the course for the transition from petal to petal. However, a better strategy might be to be on the side away from the turn in order to do a Tandem turn (cross behind the dog on the dismount of a jump). The Tandem has an accelerating quality which might make the dog a lot faster on this course, and improve the impulsion for each send.

Enter the 2019 Petit Prix

Time is growing short. The Petit Prix is less than two months away!

OR
Oct 4– 6, 2019 TDAA Petit Prix!!

Jackson County Expo, Central Point, Oregon
Judges:  Norm and Robin Carlstrom, Lynnwood, Washington
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com

Fairgrounds atmosphere. Four standard classes and six games over two days. Games include Power & Speed, Four-Leaf Clover, Lucky 13, Tag 10, Quidditch, and Snooklers. Warm-up workshops (Wed-Thu prior to PP) provide an opportunity to acclimate AND you earn Qs and titles!

Premium

The TDAA has approved a restricted entry for DOGS NOT QUALIFIED. Follow this link for information. Feel free to share this PDF.

2019PetitPrixforNQDogs.pdf

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

Games of the 2019 Petit Prix; part two

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We continue discussion of the games of the 2019 Petit Prix.

Time is growing short. The Petit Prix is less than two months away!

OR
Oct 4– 6, 2019

TDAA Petit Prix!!
Jackson County Expo, Central Point, Oregon
Judges:  Norm and Robin Carlstrom, Lynnwood, Washington
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com

Fairgrounds atmosphere. Four standard classes and six games over two days. Games include Power & Speed, Four-Leaf Clover, Lucky 13, Tag 10, Quidditch, and Snooklers. Warm-up workshops (Wed-Thu prior to PP) provide an opportunity to acclimate AND you earn Qs and titles!

Premium

The TDAA has approved a restricted entry for DOGS NOT QUALIFIED. Follow this link for information. Feel free to share this PDF.

2019PetitPrixforNQDogs.pdf

The Standard Course

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Briefing

In our culture, the Standard (numbered) course doesn’t require much of a briefing. Follow the numbers, keep the bars up, hit the paint, and have as much fun as possible.

The scoring basis is: Faults, Then Time.

This course features several international style challenges[1]. The course starts with a tight wrap. And the approach to #2 is surely a back-side, which is followed by another tight-wrap.

It’s worth noting that most of the front of the right is a “cluster” which is an arrangement of obstacles with multiple points of entry and, consequently, multiple options to exit. Half of this course involves the cluster.

The approach to the weave poles, and the dismount, are tricky technical bits.

 

The Purpose of the TDAA

We would be remiss in not including the Standard course in the discussion of Petit Prix games. There are four scheduled for the 2019 Petit Prix!

The standard course uniquely differentiates the TDAA from what you will find in any other agility organization. Aside from equipment made to scale for dogs of smaller stature, the spacing between obstacles is considerably tighter than would ever be allowed in those other organizations.

Let’s be real. Courses are designed in the agility world for the 22″ Border Collie. There is no way that the challenges are the same for the Yorkie (for example) as it is for that Border Collie. Frankly, even the handler of the fast Sheltie hasn’t much concept of the skill required to run that Border Collie… because the challenges simply are not comparable.

This is from the first page of the TDAA Rules and Regulations:

The purpose of the Teacup Dogs Agility Association is to provide a competitive venue for dogs of small stature without regard to breed or pedigree, and to encourage course challenges that are comparable to the course challenges which face large dog handlers in other popular venues.

We want the handler of the small dog to understand and master the timing and handling skills of the big dog. And the only way to do so is to present a course that requires those comparable skills.

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

[1] With apology to Nancy Gyes, as the course concept was taken from a course of her design.

Games of the 2019 Petit Prix; part one

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For the next several days we will discuss the games of the 2019 Petit Prix.

Time is growing short. The Petit Prix is less than two months away!

OR

Oct 4– 6, 2019 Trial number T19999

TDAA Petit Prix!!
Jackson County Expo, Central Point, Oregon
Judges:  Norm and Robin Carlstrom, Lynnwood, Washington
Contact:  Marsha Houston at Houston.marsha@gmail.com

Fairgrounds atmosphere. Four standard classes and six games over two days. Games include Power & Speed, Four-Leaf Clover, Lucky 13, Tag 10, Quidditch, and Snooklers. Warm-up workshops (Wed-Thu prior to PP) provide an opportunity to acclimate AND you earn Qs and titles!

Premium

The TDAA has approved a restricted entry for DOGS NOT QUALIFIED. Follow this link for information. Feel free to share this PDF.

2019PetitPrixforNQDogs.pdf

 

Power and Speed

Power and Speed has been a part of the American dog agility culture for about 30 years. This game is a regular feature in TDAA competition.

Power and Speed is typically the first event of a trial weekend because it uniquely allows handlers to introduce their dogs to the contact obstacles without being in much of a hurry about it. The Power end of the game, where the contact equipment is found, is untimed.

A sample course and briefing are presented below. A short section on strategy will follow the briefing.

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Briefing

The dog will run a course that is split into two sections: Power and Speed.

Power – The Power section on this course is the blue numbered sequence.

The Power section is un-timed. Consequently, the start-line is positioned between the last obstacle of the Power section and the first obstacle of the Speed section. Any faults earned by the dog will be added to the dog’s score. For example, if the dog misses a contact or earns a refusal on a contact obstacle, his score would be 5 for the Power section. Obviously, the ideal score for the Power section is 0.

Speed – The Speed section contains a straightforward sequence of jumps and tunnels, labeled #1 to #12 on this course.

Scoring and Qualification

Power and Speed is scored Time, Plus Faults. Faults from both sections are added time.

Qualifying course time shall be based on a measurement of the Speed section.

Strategies

As the Power section is not timed, you should take every opportunity to work the bottom contacts in this section in a leisurely manner. There is no ticking clock.

The time for the game is based on the Speed section which is typically a fast Jumpers kind of course. The QCT is based on rates of travel at the top of the range. As the scoring basis is Time, Plus Faults you’ll find the Qualifying Course Time not very forgiving of any fault.

Note that the Starting line is after the last obstacle of the Power section. The handler should always make an assessment whether there is any advantage in taking a lead-out. Since the Power section is un-timed, the handler has an option to leave the dog in a stay and begin the Speed section in a control position forward of the dog.

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Questions comments & impassioned speeches to Bud Houston Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Visit our web store: www.dogagility.org/newstore. You’ll find in the web store The Book of Agility Games, a comprehensive reference to all manner of agility games played for competition and fun around the world.

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